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Gift presents: bookish tutorial, kids craft ideas

Sewing  |  August 16th 2011  |  0 Comment

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Sewing book tutorial

I bet that just about every craft blogger out there has a SouleMama post that sends them sprinting for the worktable, & mine was the one about the tiny books.  My kids are dedicated artists & storytellers (especially my daughter, who loves narrative like nobody I’ve ever met, except maybe me, which I suspect is sometimes very, very tiring to the men in our household), we have teetering piles of pads & notebooks & story pages & drawings all over the place, & still it had never occurred to me to have a stack of little books around waiting to be filled up instead of waiting to bind the finished product.

I had the cardstock & paper, but no working stapler.  I did, however, have plenty of embroidery floss, a longtime love for the book arts, & an inability to pass up the opportunity to make something just a little bit more complex in the name of aesthetics.  Though, really, simple stitched books like this are barely harder than stapled ones.

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Cut a sheet of cardstock in half (to 8.5″ wide x 5.5″ tall), then cut six sheets of paper to 8.25″ wide by 5.5″ tall. (Trimming that 1/4″ will keep your pages from sticking out from the edges of the cover when the book is done.)

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Fold the cardstock in half (to 4.25″ x 5.5″), then do the same with the stack of paper.  A bone folder will give a nice crisp crease.

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Put the cardstock on top of the stack of pages, matching at the fold line, then clip together on one end.  Punch three holes along the crease.  I happened to have a spring action “anywhere” punch around, so I punched 1/16″ holes, but you can use anything that will make a small hole, really.

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Using 3 strands of an 11″ piece of embroidery floss, take your needle down through the center hole,

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up through one end (leave a long enough tail at center to tie a square knot),

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down through the other end,

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& back up through the center hole.

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Use the ends to tie a knot around the long stitch

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& you’re done.  Barely more time than stapling, right?

My kids spent the entire afternoon with these.

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Gift presents: bookish tutorial,

kids craft ideas

glittergoods.typepad.com

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I bet that just about every craft blogger out there has a SouleMama post that sends them sprinting for the worktable, & mine was the one about the tiny books.  My kids are dedicated artists & storytellers (especially my daughter, who loves narrative like nobody I’ve ever met, except maybe me, which I suspect is sometimes very, very tiring to the men in our household), we have teetering piles of pads & notebooks & story pages & drawings all over the place, & still it had never occurred to me to have a stack of little books around waiting to be filled up instead of waiting to bind the finished product.

I had the cardstock & paper, but no working stapler.  I did, however, have plenty of embroidery floss, a longtime love for the book arts, & an inability to pass up the opportunity to make something just a little bit more complex in the name of aesthetics.  Though, really, simple stitched books like this are barely harder than stapled ones.

Dsc_0080_edited1

Cut a sheet of cardstock in half (to 8.5″ wide x 5.5″ tall), then cut six sheets of paper to 8.25″ wide by 5.5″ tall. (Trimming that 1/4″ will keep your pages from sticking out from the edges of the cover when the book is done.)

Dsc_0082_edited1

Fold the cardstock in half (to 4.25″ x 5.5″), then do the same with the stack of paper.  A bone folder will give a nice crisp crease.

Dsc_0085_edited1

Put the cardstock on top of the stack of pages, matching at the fold line, then clip together on one end.  Punch three holes along the crease.  I happened to have a spring action “anywhere” punch around, so I punched 1/16″ holes, but you can use anything that will make a small hole, really.

Dsc_0086_edited1

Using 3 strands of an 11″ piece of embroidery floss, take your needle down through the center hole,

Dsc_0087_edited1

up through one end (leave a long enough tail at center to tie a square knot),

Dsc_0089_edited1

down through the other end,

Dsc_0091_edited1

& back up through the center hole.

Dsc_0092_edited1

Use the ends to tie a knot around the long stitch

Dsc_0094_edited1

& you’re done.  Barely more time than stapling, right?

My kids spent the entire afternoon with these.

Dsc_0068_edited1