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Crafts for summer: Summer Garden Granny Square, kids craft ideas

Crochet  |  August 2nd 2011  |  0 Comment

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Crafts for summer: Summer Garden Granny Square, kids craft ideas

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I love making Granny Squares. There’s just something about creating little stacks of them that is hugely satisfying. They are versatile, and easy for beginners to learn because the basic stitches and method of working “in the round” are simple to get to grips with. It’s how I first learnt to crochet 18 months ago, and I still get a huge amount of pleasure from making granny squares.

This particular square, which I am calling my Summer Garden Granny Square, is my own pattern. It came about after I had an idea of making squares for a blanket, which when all assembled together would resemble a garden blooming with summer flowers. I couldn’t find a pattern which was simple enough to make, or produced the effect I was after, so I experimented and created my own. And to be perfectly honest with you all, I am thrilled with how it turned out.

So :: For my blanket squares (pictured above) I’m using a DK weight pure wool, with a 4mm hook. I’ve also made them with Rowan DK cotton and they are equally lovely, they come out slightly larger when made with the cotton yarn.

I’m going to write the pattern in UK crochet terms where the main stitch is a UK Treble. For those in the US, this is the same as a dc stitch.

Stitches used are as follows:

 

 

sl st (slip stitch) :: insert hook, yarn over, pull the loop back through the stitch, then through the loop on your hook.

Bobble :: yarn over, insert hook through next stitch, yarn over, hook back through stitch (3 loops on hook), yarn over and pull through 2 loops (2 loops left on hook). Then yarn over and insert hook through SAME STITCH, yarn over, hook back through stitch (4 loops on hook), yarn over and pull through 2 loops (3 loops left on hook), yarn over and pull through all 3 loops.

Bobble Stitch  is not a difficult stitch even though it may sound complicated. Try watching the little Bobble Stitch video I’ve linked to above, it might help if you see the stitch being made.

Tr :: yarn over, insert hook, yarn over, pull the loop back through the stitch (three loops on hook), yarn over and pull through two loops on hook (two loops left on hook), yarn over and pull through remaining two loops. (NB this is equivalent to US dc stitch)

To Start ::

chain 4 and join to form a ring. The ring will be small, so wiggle it with your fingers to make sure you know where the centre of the ring is, because for the first round you will be working out of this hole.

ROUND 1 ::

chain 3 , then work 1 tr into the ring (this effectively counts as your first “bobble”), chain 1.

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*Work 1 bobble stitch (as described above) into the ring, chain 1*

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Repeat between ** 6 more times, until you have 8 “bobble spokes” in total.

It may feel as if you can’t quite fit them all in towards the end because the hole in the central ring is small, but you want it to be tight so the hole almost disappears.

Make a sl st into the 3rd chain of your initial chain-3 to join, finish off (picture below)

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ROUND 2 ::

You will be working out of the chain-1 spaces between the bobbles for this round.

Join in your new colour by making a secure knot close to the stitches. Insert hook through nearest chain-1 space of the previous round and draw the new colour yarn through to the front (picture below).

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Chain 3 (counts as 1 tr), 2tr into the same space, chain 1. This forms a “tr cluster” (picture below).

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Into the next space between bobbles, *work 3tr, chain 1*.

Repeat between ** 6 more times, working your way round the circle, making a total of 8 “tr clusters”.

Make a sl st into the 3rd chain of your initial chain-3 to join, finish off (picture below)
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And thats your flowery circle made! Was that fun and easy?

You can stitch a pretty button in the centre, attach them to whatever tickles your fancy.

Or you can carry on and turn the circles into squares….

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ROUND 3 ::

You will be working out of the chain-1 spaces between the tr clusters of the previous round.

Join in new colour by knotting close to the work. Insert hook into the nearest space between clusters and pull the new colour yarn through to the front.

chain 4 (counts as 1 tr + chain-1 space)

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Into the same space, work 3tr, chain-1 (picture below). This forms part of a corner cluster :: you will come back round to complete this corner at the end of the round.

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Into the next space, work 3 tr, chain-1. This forms a side cluster.

Into the next space work 3 tr, chain-2, 3 tr, chain-1. This forms your second corner cluster.

Into the next space work 3 tr, chain-1. this forms your second side cluster.

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Continue working your way round as follows ::

Into the next space work 3 tr, chain-2, 3 tr, chain-1. This forms your third corner cluster.

Into the next space work 3 tr, chain-1. this forms your third side cluster.

Into the next space work 3 tr, chain-2, 3 tr, chain-.1 This forms your fourth corner cluster.

Into the next space work 3 tr, chain-1. this forms your fourth side cluster.

Lastly, work 2 tr into the very first space you started out in.This effectively joins with your initial chain-3 to complete that part of the first corner cluster (picture below)

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Make a sl st into the 3rd chain of your initial chain-3, finish off (picture below)

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ROUND 4 ::

You will be working out of the chain-1 spaces between the tr clusters of the previous round.

Join in new colour by knotting close to the work. Insert hook into the  space between the corner clusters of the previous round  and pull the new colour yarn through to the front (picture below)

chain 4 (counts as 1 tr + chain-1 space)

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Into the same space, work 3 tr, chain-1. This forms part of a corner cluster :: you will come back round to complete this corner at the end of the round.

*Into the next space, work 3 tr, chain-1. This forms a side cluster.

Into the next space, work 3 tr, chain-1. This forms an additional side cluster.

Into the next space work 3 tr, chain-2, 3 tr, chain-1. This forms your second corner cluster.*

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Repeat between ** twice more.

Into the next space, work 3 tr, chain-1. This forms a side cluster.

Into the next space, work 3 tr, chain-1. This forms an additional side cluster.

Lastly, work 2t r into the very first space you started out in.This effectively joins with your initial chain-3 to complete that part of the first corner cluster.

Make a sl st into the 3rd chain of your initial chain-3, finish off (picture below)

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And there you have it :: one Summer Garden Granny Square.

I always think that crochet patterns can sometimes come across as quite daunting and slightly off putting. My hope is that by using plenty of photos and by being more wordy than usual patterns, that you will be able to follow it successfully, even if you are relatively new to crochet.

Incidentally, you don’t have to make 4 rounds if you don’t want to (you can stick with 3 as in the top photo), or you can carry on making more rounds to produce bigger squares, it is up to you.

If you carry on adding more rounds, just keep an eye on the pattern and on where you’re at as you work round. Remember that with each extra round you do, you will be increasing the number of tr clusters round each side. Each side cluster of 3tr’s should be separated by a chain-1 space. And make sure that when you get to the corner space you make two lots of tr-clusters in the same hole, separated by a chain-2 space. Once you get going it’ll be easy to get this and you’ll find that very quickly you won’t be needing to read the pattern at all, you’ll just get what to do. Yes, honestly, it’ll happen!

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I tell you, these little squares are super-addictive. You will be treble-clustering in every spare moment of your day, sneaking them in, building little piles of them.

 

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So this is how it is coming along so far :: I am making four small squares and crocheting them together, then adding three rounds of “grannying” round the outside, ending in white.

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